OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind. OUR STORY The vision for the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM) is to engage and empower African American women across the socioeconomic spectrum in Greater Cincinnati to live healthier lives — body and mind.

The President and CEO of The Health Gap Renee Mahaffey Harris initiated that vision and helped set the foundation for the movement.

OUR STATEMENT

The Health Gap is the catalyst for improving health outcomes through the Black Women’s Health Movement (BWHM). Our work uniquely enables us to mobilize this movement of individuals, organizations, businesses and providers. Our aim is to mobilize the city to bring culturally-relevant, evidence-based solutions to improve the health outcomes of Black women and their families.

BY JOINING BWHM

WOMEN will have resources that are designed by and for them.

ORGANIZATIONS will expand their reach and have a stronger impact.

BUSINESSES will share their expertise and grow their awareness. Everyone has a place within one or more of the focus areas: Physical Health, Mental Health, Economic Health, Community Health.

LOOKING FORWARD

There is a plethora of individualized programming in Greater Cincinnati attempting to reach Black women, but as with any effort, working in silos limits the potential success of these efforts. Health disparities have not changed in 30 years. There is strength in numbers – the goal of BWHM is to work together and move the needle on health outcomes for Black families!

BWHM IN THE NEWS

We are working hard in our community to make a difference. Check out stories about our efforts and the momentum we’re gaining throughout the Greater Cincinnati region. Come back often for updates.

POWERED BY THE HEALTH GAP

The Health Gap’s mission is based on the principle that the people most affected by health disparities must create their own solutions and monitor their own progress through a Grassroots Mobilization Model that engages, advocates and empowers community members. This work has impacted more than 365,000 people in lower income communities since 2004.